Randy MacKenzie, NM
lichess
08/28/20 15:55
stefi's image
Community Chess Club — about

How did you learn HTML?

In the mid-1990's, I procrastinated for months in learning HTML, a mark-up language originally designed for non-technical acedemics to create web pages. I have no formal training.

While playing chess on FICS one bright Saturday morning, I met JohnnyRio, who said he had worked in an illegal auto chop shop, stripping down stolen cars for parts. While serving thirty-seven months in an Oregon State Prison for Grand Theft Auto (GTA), or soon thereafter, he created a Bobby Fischer fan web site. It was a simple web page and had a little table with an "x" marked for months that he had Chess Life magazine issues. Thrilling, isn't it? A convicted felon had a web page. I had none and had recently been cleared of all charges. Something about they never found the head. Whatever.

I resolved to learn HTML. Usually I went inline skating on Saturday. But I fired up the windows for workgroups 3.1 editor and grunged my way through a version of "Hello World" as a link in a web page. Maintaining this web site has necessitated updating those rusty HTML coding skills, first to XHTML and then to HTML5. That taught me to be more thoughtful and careful in producing good code. True story.

At any rate, on September 30, 2008, about 13.05 years ago, I took the plunge and registered this domain. And I was stuck with the name.

Update (09/01/2021): I have coded a suite of CCCR web apps. It does accounting, pairings, files rating reports and maintains club and uscf local data.

"Chess is in its essence a game, in its form an art, and in its execution a science." (Baron Tassilo)

Why write valid HTML code?

At the bottom of this page are links to W3C validation tests for W3C HTML5 compliance. The higher the level of conformity, the more uniformly the pages will render among the various browsers. It also helps by catching errors, which I correct. There are other reasons to validate html, including the fact that search engine spiders often can't effectively parse or categorize sites with bad html. Most webmasters write sloppy code and hope that the browser will automatically correct the errors. This is only partially true. This page has cross-browser uniformity, having been tested in chrome, safari, firefox and microsoft edge. It adheres to standard code and validates. The pages generally load quicker without the proprietary browser specific code. But varying degrees of W3C browser compliance affects minor cosmetics such as rounded corners and drop shadows. is probably a good choice.

"I am still a victim of Chess. It has all the beauty of art and much more. It cannot be commercialized. Chess is much purer than art in its social position." (Marcel Duchamp)

Is being a webmaster difficult?

Being a webmaster without a computer is difficult. I plan to buy a nice one in late 2021, finances permitting. For now this means a slog of some ten miles, twice a week. I walk through snow and cold in winter, the rains of April, and the searing heat of summer. Arriving at the Henrietta Public Library, I use a free computer. Bus service is sporatic.

The hardest thing is supervising, training and selecting staff. Sometimes you've got to be cruel to be kind. And it breaks my heart to reject players' game submissions, but I must maintain high standards.

I learned HTML in the mid-1990's after procrastinating for months. It's a mark-up language originally designed for non-technical acedemics to create web pages. I have no formal training.

While playing chess on FICS, I met JohnnyRio, who said he had worked in an illegal auto chop shop, stripping down stolen cars for parts. While serving thirty-seven months in an Oregon State Prison for Grand Theft Auto (GTA), or soon thereafter, he created a Bobby Fischer fan web site. It was a simple web page and had a little table with an "x" marked for months that he had Chess Life magazine issues. Thrilling, isn't it?

A convicted felon had a web page. I had none and had recently been cleared of all charges. Something about they never found the head. Whatever. After this lucky break, I resolved to learn HTML. Maintaining this web site has necessitated updating those rusty HTML coding skills, first to XHTML and then to HTML5. That taught me to be more thoughtful and careful in producing good code.

"Everything is in a state of flux, and this includes the world of Chess." (Mikhail Botvinnik)

What's it like being webmaster?

It's difficult because I don't actually own a computer. I plan to buy a nice one in late 2021, finances permitting. For now this means a slog of some twelve miles, twice a week. I walk through snow and cold in winter, the rains of April, and the searing heat of summer. Arriving at the Henrietta Public Library, I use a free computer. Bus service is sporatic.

The hardest thing is supervising, training and selecting staff. Sometimes you've got to be cruel to be kind.

"The pawns are the soul of the game." (Francois Andre Danican Philidor)

Chewy Verdugal's tech notes

I started with a CSS framework called Twitter Bootstrap. I then moved to Zurb Foundation which I liked a little more.

Current PHP version: 7.2.34 The pgn parser was chesstempo pgn-viewer, now I use pgn4web. The free chess diagram generator is from ChessImager.

The games table uses advanced interaction controls by datatables a jQuery plugin.

JPG's are prepared for the web with gimp and imagemagick. HTML, javascript and css files are edited with Komodo Edit and some are minified by YUI Compressor. Some find the Google closure compiler does a better job of compression.

Tool tips are by qTip2, a fine product. Progressive disclosure is by Zander Labs - Wagstaff. Hyphenation is by hyphenator. The email contact form is filtered by Dominic Sayer's RFC-compliant email address validator php script. Limiting Textarea Text by Stephen Chapman helps protect the contact form from over-zealous posters. Andy Langton's show/hide/mini-accordion is used to show and hide text. CDN Content Delivery Network is by Amazon S3 cloudfront. Fades are by onextrapixel. The HTML template I used is designed by Luka Cvrk, Solucija. I use a Corporate Gibberish Generator™ to help me explain the purpose of this website.

The modals are by Eric Martin's simplemodal and Cody Lindley's jQuery-swip and TinyBox2.

101 Fun Things to Do to Freak Out Your College Roommate! provided snippets of useful humor. The list of things to do while bored helped a bit, too.

This is a Microsoft-free web site. Not a single line of code was written here using any Microsoft product. Instead various flavors of Linux were used, mostly Debian and its derivatives. All but Komodo Edit are open source or GPL. You can have them for free and use them however you choose.

Since the internet itself runs on Linux and 91% of supercomputers run on Linux, a web developer's rig should, too. The best and fastest computers are Linux computers.

"Some part of a mistake is always correct." (Tartakower)